History of Whitbread & Co. Ltd. of London in the county of Oxfordshire

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Some history of Whitbread & Co. Ltd.

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Newspaper Articles

"On Tuesday, the greatest excitement was caused in the neighbourhood of Chiswell Street, Finsbury, by an accident at the extensive brewery of Messrs. Whitbread and Co., where a portion of the premises are being pulled down for re-building. Whilst the workmen were thus engaged a tremendous noise was heard, as if an explosion had taken place, and the whole thoroughfare in an instant became obscured by dust. It would appear that the foreman was superintending the work going on when he noticed some of the walls tottering to and fro. He at once, upon seeing the danger, called to his men to make a precipitate retreat. This they did with the exception of one man, and he appeared to be paralysed with fright, was unable to run away, and the consequence was that when the brickwork fell it partially buried the poor fellow, both feet and legs being embedded in the rubbish. Upwards of an hour was spent in getting the man out, when he was found to be so much crushed that he was taken to the hospital of St. Bartholomew, where he lies in a very precarious condition."
"Accident at Whitbread's Brewery"
Kentish Chronicle : Saturday August 11th 1866 Page 3.

"Yesterday [Thursday] forenoon an inquiry held by Mr. Richards, deputy coroner, at the Green Gate Tavern, City Road, relative to the death of William Ward, aged thirty years, who committed suicide. The deceased was employed as a labourer at Whitbread's brewery in St. Luke's. He was of a gloomy and morose temper. Within the last few days he was suspended for using violent language to a foreman, but on his promising better behaviour, he was placed on again. He appeared to converse with his brother, with whom he lived at 20, Rose Street, St. Luke's, principally upon the best way of getting rid of oneself. He frequently said to him that would like to know the best way of getting rid of himself, for he was tired of life, but did not know what to do. His brother and his landlady tried to joke him out of this state of mind. The manner of his suicide was deposed to by David Freeman, "leather holder," a person whose duty it was to fill casks with beer from the vats by means of leather pipes. On Tuesday morning, at nine o'clock, he was underneath vat No. 19, which was empty of beer, but filled with carbonic acid gas. He heard a lucifer match struck at the top of the vat, which was 27ft. high, and called out twice, but received no answer. He ran to the top of the vat, and there he found a light burning, and the name "W. Ward" chalked on the beam over the vat in large letters. He raised an alarm, and the deceased was seen lying at the bottom of the vat, quite dead. No one dared enter the vat, and drags had to be employed to get deceased out. Dr. Yarrow paid said that he was called in to the deceased, and found him quite dead. His face was distorted and the body swollen. He had been killed by carbonic acid gas, and death must have been instantaneous. A light was instantly extinguished when lowered into the vat, which was 27 feet deep, and was filled with the deadly gas to within a foot or two of the top. It was stated that the deceased, who had been long employed at the brewery, was perfectly acquainted with the nature the gas, and that, without doubt, he knew well what he was doing when he jumped into the vat. Latterly he had complained of not feeling as he ought, and said that wished to end his life. The coroner having summed up, The jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed suicide by leaping into a vat filled with carbonic acid gas at Whitbread's brewery, whilst in a state of unsound mind."
"Suicide at Whitbread's Brewery"
Clerkenwell News : Friday October 26th 1866 Page 2.

"Mr. Francis Pelham Whitbread, whose death is announced today, had been chairman of Messrs. Whitbread and Co., Ltd., the brewers, since 1892. He was 74."
"Brewer Dead"
Manchester Evening News : October 30th 1941 Page 8.

Genealogy Connections

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Whitbread's London Stout

Whitbread's - All Over London

Whitbread's Extra Stout

Whitbread Forest Brown

Whitbread Bottled Beers

The Best of the Light Ales is a Whitbread

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Whitbread - Brewers of Fine Beers since 1742

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Quotation

Jim West

"When the pilgrims, seeking religious freedom, landed at Plymouth rock, the first permanent building put up was the brewery."
Jim West

Eduard Grutzner - Bruder Braumeister im Bierkeller [1902]

Newspaper Articles

"On Thursday morning, between three and four, a fire was discovered to have broken out in Chiswell Street, Finsbury, on the premises belonging to Messrs. Whitbread, brewers. The discovery was made by a watchman, who noticed smoke issuing from the ale tun room and the boiling pack room, a building about 45 by 30 feet, in the highest part of the brewery. Underneath were the stables, and one time it was feared that the fire would extend to them. The escape conductors and others got about 30 horses out, and by the time this was accomplished, the flames shot through the roof and illuminated the whole district. Nine land steam fire engines and one manual power machine attended, and the mains of the New River Company affording a bountiful supply of water, three land steamers and one manual power were set to work. Some thousands of gallons of water were thrown upon and into the burning premises, and in about an hour and a half the fire was extinguished, but not until the ale tun room, the boiling pack room, and the roof were nearly destroyed, and a considerable quantity of ale in the coolers seriously damaged by water. The misfortune will not interfere with the business of the firm."
"Fire at Whitbread's Brewery"
London Evening Standard : July 27th 1866 Page 3.