Some history of the Old Crown Inn on High Street Deritend in Birmingham in the County of Warwickshire

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More information on the Old Crown Inn on High Street Deritend to follow. I probably created the page as I had a link to the Old Crown Inn from another page. When building the site it is easier to place links as they crop up rather than go back later on. I realise this is frustrating if you were specifically looking for information on the Old Crown Inn. There is information on Birmingham dotted around the website - click here for a suitable starting place.

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Birmingham : Old Crown Inn on the corner of High Street Deritend and Heath Mill Lane [c.1890]

Birmingham : Customers and Pedestrians outside the Old Crown Inn on the corner of High Street Deritend and Heath Mill Lane [c.1890]

Birmingham : Old Crown Inn on the corner of High Street Deritend and Heath Mill Lane [1907]

Birmingham : Drinkers outside the Old Crown Inn on the corner of High Street Deritend and Heath Mill Lane [1907]

Birmingham : The Ansell's-operated Old Crown Inn on High Street Deritend [c.1935]

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Licensees of the Old Crown Inn

1801 - 1820 William Thomas
1820 - 1827 John Carr
1827 - William Starkey
1835 - Joseph Baylis
Note : this is not a complete list of licensees for this pub.

Ansell's - The Better Beer

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Related Newspaper Articles

"Thrown from its line of direction by hitting a tramcar, a heavy lorry crashed, yesterday, into one of the oldest houses still standing in Birmingham. Despite considerable damage, however, it transpires that the antique timbering escaped. The accident occurred in Deritend during the lunch-hour rush, the buildings involved being part of the row known as Ye Olde Crown. It is supposed that a section of this is of late 14th century origin. The lorry, the property of Mr. Greenwood, Mansfield Road, Aston, entered the premises used as a packing-room by Mr. Rodway, confectioner, and came to rest with its bonnet inside a room where two girls were working at a table. They had the startling experience of seeing a man hurled through the window when the collision took place. This man was treated for a thigh injury at the General Hospital. There would have been serious casualties if the path of the lorry had been deflected just a little further, an this would have sent it into the confectionery shop itself, which contained several customers. As it was, brickwork up to a height of 2½ft. was demolished. On this rested a large plate-glass window, but evidently the original timbering of the main front structure escaped damage."
"Smash at Deritend"
Birmingham Daily Gazette : January 24th 1929 Page 5

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Brummagem Boozers

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