History and Information on Latimer Street in Lee Bank at Birmingham in the County of Warwickshire.

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Some history of Latimer Street

More information on Latimer Street to follow. I probably created the page as I had a link to Latimer Street from another page. When building the site it is easier to place links as they crop up rather than go back later on. I realise this is frustrating if you were specifically looking for information on Latimer Street. There is information on Birmingham dotted around the website - click here for a suitable starting place.

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More information on Latimer Street to follow......

Birmingham : Saint Asaph's Church on the corner of Latimer Street and Great Colmore Street at Lee Bank [c.1950]

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More information on Latimer Street to follow......

We Love Dark Star Beer - Click here for more details

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Street Scenes in Latimer Street

Photographs and details to follow......

Birmingham : Shop and Housing in Latimer Street at Lee Bank [1961]

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Brummagem Boozers


Latimer Street Pubs

Map

The map extract below shows the locations of the licensed houses in Latimer Street in 1891. Reasonably accurate, the locations were roughly marked on the plan for the licensing justices of Birmingham. The map itself was drawn up by the city surveyor in June 1891. The red dots show fully licensed houses which, in 1891, numbered 653. Blue dots denoted beer houses, the total for which numbered 1,026. Green dots showed 499 off licences of various kinds. The total number of licensed houses was 2,178. I also have a similar map dated 1873, drawn up by the city surveyor William S. Till, which was used to plot the public houses of Birmingham in 1875 when there were many more beer houses.

Birmingham : Map showing licensed houses in Latimer Street at Lee Bank [1891]

Note that the thoroughfare during the Victorian era was known as Latimer Street South. Latimer Street at this time was an extension of Upper Gough Street and close to Saint Thomas's Church. Latimer Street was later called Ridley Street - it is not to be confused with this thoroughfare at Lee Bank, the name of which was shortened to Latimer Street.

Genealogy Connections

If you have a genealogy story or query regarding Latimer Street you can contact me and I will post it here in addition to including your message within the website pages for Birmingham Genealogy.

Have Your Say

If you would like to share any further information on Latimer Street - perhaps you drank in one of the pubs in the past? Or maybe knew a previous publican running one of the boozers? Whatever the reason it would be great to hear of your stories or gossip. Simply send a message and I'll post it here.

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Mitchell's & Butler's - Good Honest Beer

Ansell's Bitter Men - You Can't Beat 'Em


Related Newspaper Articles

"James William Hulme Milne [28], of Latimer Street, Edgbaston. Birmingham, was at Birmingham Assizes yesterday sentenced to ten years' imprisonment after the Jury had taken only eight minutes to find him guilty of breaking and entering Barclays Bank, Bordesley, in September, and stealing £27,136 and jewellery. Mr. Justice Paull told him : "This was not the first time you have taken part in this sort of carefully-planned, well-executed crime. You played for high stakes, large sums of money. People who take part in these robberies for large sums must realise they do so at the peril of going to prison for a very long time.' Detective Inspector James Finlay said that in 1952 Milne and two other men had opened a shop safe and stolen £25. In 1954, in company with several other men, he had blown open an office safe and stolen £2,349. Milne had been discharged from the Army Catering Corps as a "psychopathic personality." When the case opened, the prosecution alleged that he had tunnelled through the rear brick wall of the bank and had stolen the money from the vaults. He was arrested seven weeks later while receiving hospital treatment for injuries sustained in a road accident. Milne said in evidence that he "emphatically denied" breaking into the bank. Questioned about a statement in which he was alleged to have told the police that he had photographed the bank vaults from the top of a bus, Milne said : "I don't remember saying half these things."
"10 Year Sentence for Bank Robbery"
Birmingham Daily Post : December 16th 1960 Page 24

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